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It’s a no-brainer for any motorbike enthusiast, really. In almost all cases, building a motorcycle is far more expensive than buying an already assembled bike. The reason behind this is quite simple, too; buying bike parts separately costs way more than the estimated price.

Moreover, a DIY bike takes up a lot of your time, and the lost time accumulates to the overall cost as well.

Since you’re here, you must still be wondering, is it cheaper to build a motorcycle or buy one? We’ve already answered that question, but we’re not just shooting blanks – we have ample information to support our claim. All you have to do is go through our comparison between an assembled bike and a DIY one!

Buying A Fully Assembled Motorcycle: Should I Go For A New Or Old One?

Most bikers with a limited budget opt for fully assembled motorcycles, and there are a few specific reasons behind them. Firstly, it doesn’t take up a lot of time to choose bikes from a bike shop – it’s usually a quick purchase.

You also get to do decent research about your preferred bike online and finally opt for one. For commuters and dispatch riders, a relatively cheap and efficient motorbike is more than enough, so the whole bike purchasing process isn’t time-consuming at all.

Next, a big decision has to be made regarding brand-new or used/reconditioned bikes. Expectedly, new bikes will cost more than the refurbished ones, but they’ll also have much better performances.

Moreover, many new motorcycles come with discounts, so you might just want to wait a while for the discounts and get a new one. That doesn’t mean old bikes are bad, though. It’s just that there’s always a risk that it might turn into a money pit.

Price

It’s no surprise that new bikes will cost you more than reconditioned ones, but most people opt for new ones because of their risk-free nature. Having a brand-new bike acts as a thrill to many, and they’re willing to pay some extra bucks for that premium feel.

Moreover, the warranty and discounts in the future do make you feel like the initial cost is justified.

Used bikes, on the other hand, are much cheaper. And if you have a serious budget constraint and you find a used bike from someone reliable – you might just go for it.

That being said, you’ll have to directly pay in cash for almost all the used bikes, whereas you might pay the money in installments if you go for a brand-new bike. For people with budget issues, installments can be a fantastic way to use a new motorbike and also not pay a huge sum of money at once.

Condition

When it comes to motorbikes, you get what you pay for. Spending a low amount on used, old bikes might save you a few bucks, but the condition of that bike won’t be decent – you’ll still have to pay for the repairing cost.

Now, if you get the bike almost for free, then the repair costs might be much lesser than buying an entirely new one. Moreover, if you’re buying a used bike from a renowned shop, then chances are that it will be in quite a decent condition.

Yes, it’s true that new bikes will come in tip-top condition, so many people prefer not to take the risk of a used one.

But if you are one of the risk-takers, then you should know that high mileage or any damages bring the price down, whereas additional modification on the bike raises the price. In short, the price of a refurbished bike mostly depends on its overall condition.

Factory Grade Parts

New bikes are blessed with factory-grade, top-quality parts in every department of the motorbike. On the other hand, old bikes often need repairs or replacements on damaged parts, so you might not have all the factory-grade parts in a used bike when you buy it.

Maintenance

New bikes are pricier than old ones, but the maintenance cost of an old, used bike is significantly higher than that of a new one in most cases. Also, new bikes come with warranty offers, most of them being at least for a year.

The warranty/guarantee covers most of the fundamental issues you face while using a motorbike. You do have to pay a certain amount for services, though, but that’s nowhere near the amount you’ll have to pay for a used one. In the long run, a new bike seems like a more cost-efficient option than a used bike.

Mileage

New bikes will come with zero mileage, thereby guaranteeing you a long-lasting service. On the other hand, the more the mileage, the more the chances that you’ll have to spend a few extra bucks on servicing and other issues.

Issues like brake overhauls, wheel bearings, and suspension linkage are bound to occur more frequently with high-mileage bikes. For example, if a bike has an annual mileage of more than 2000 miles, it shouldn’t be a wise option to go for it.

Depreciation

New bikes tend to depreciate much quicker than used ones. Even if you haven’t started riding it, the moment you sign the papers and buy the bike, it takes an instant hit on the depreciation. Keeping that in mind, used bikes have a better value of reselling if you consider the percentage.

There are cases where your old bike is considered a ‘collectible’ to people, and you might even get a higher price for it!

For short-term usage, we do suggest you go for used ones, mostly because of their resale values. However, in the long run, it’s always better to get a new one!

Pros

  • Assembled bikes save a lot of your time and money
  • Very well-balanced and cost-effective bike options to choose from
  • Bikes from reputed manufacturers have a decent choice of components

Cons

  • You can’t handpick the components on the bike
  • Low-level manufacturers often add cheap and low-quality components to decrease the price and increase sales

Building Your Own Motorcycle

Building a bike all on your own seems like a fun job if you have the financial capabilities. Before we move on to the details of cost, you should look at the quick pros and cons of building a bike all by yourself.

Pros

  • Amazing learning experience if you want to try out as a bike mechanic
  • Great customizability and flexibility – you get to pick your own preferred components in each sector
  • You get a unique, one-of-a-kind bike, second to none in the world

Cons

  • Requires highly expensive tools that are usually of no use other than building a bike
  • Takes up a massive amount of time
  • You need to have ample experience in building a bike; otherwise, the project will fall apart
  • The components are often very expensive

How Much Does It Cost to Build a Motorcycle?

Custom-made bikes usually cost a lot of money, mostly because the parts, when bought individually, cost way more than when they’re sold as a whole bike.

Rare parts are certainly more expensive, but in general, custom bikes cost you from $20,000 to $50,000. The average cost is $30,000, but it depends on the parts you use and if you’re taking any professional help for the engineering or not.

Rounding Up

We believe it’s quite clear now that even though building a motorcycle gives you a sense of freedom in terms of components and engineering, it’s far too expensive than buying a new bike.

So, we believe we have a clear answer to the question: is it cheaper to build a motorcycle or buy one? It’s pretty obvious that buying a new bike is definitely cheaper than building one!

Meta

Many people have the same question: Is it cheaper to build a motorcycle or buy one? In this article, we provided a definite answer to that. Read more to know!

References:

  1. https://thekneeslider.com/what-does-it-cost-to-build-a-motorcycle/
  2. https://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/five-reasons-you-should-build-a-motorcycle

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